Tag: Mulayam Singh

Short -Term Games Political Parties Play

By Malladi Rama Rao Funny it may sound but the reality is that even before the talk about a new third front takes concrete shape, soothsayers are out in number to pronounce its death. Every analyst is blaming Karunanidhi and Mulayam Singh that in their sunset years both are allowing their sons to dictate the destiny of their parties. There is an element of truth in the criticism but it doesn’t answer the basic question: who started the guessing game to begin with. You may not like DMK supremo, whose forte has always been to be on the side of

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No game-changer electoral game

By Malladi Rama Rao CONGRESS politicians of Delhi school seldom speak their mind. When they do, they are careful enough to not harm the interests of the high command and at the same time they ensure that their place under the Banyan tree is safe and secure. So much so, the comments of Chief Minister, Sheila Dixit (76), against the Delhi Police are good food for thought. On the Women’s Day, she lamented that her own daughter felt insecure in Delhi as it became a crime capital of India. She did not field the obvious question – if a CM’s

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Name Change Politics in India

By Atul Cowshish & M Rama Rao New Delhi (Syndicate Features): As chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, the Bahujan Samaj Party supremo Mayawati had gone on an unprecedented spree to rename towns, cities, public places and institutions and justified it in the name of honouring the ‘forgotten’ Dalit icons of India. She changed names of many districts and built imposing monuments and extravagant parks and named them after her mentor, Kanshi Ram. Life-size stone statutes of elephants surrounded these parks which had giant-size statues of not only Kanshi Ram’s but hers also—quite an unusual thing. The Samajwadi Party government that

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Options After the Ayodhya Verdict

By ALLABAKSH New Delhi (Syndicate Features): The judgment delivered by the special bench of the Allahabad High Court at Lucknow was received by many within the country—politicians, intellectuals and the intelligentsia–as one that provides an opportunity to end the bitter dispute over the ownership of the temple-mosque complex in Ayodhya. The Bharatiya Janata Party had surprised many by not over-reacting to the judgement, at least in the public comments of its leaders and appealing for calm. Equally surprising was the sobering tone with which the Muslim litigant groups reacted even though they clearly hinted that they would take the matter

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